Archive for the 'Science Fiction and Fantasy' Category

ReMade Redux!


My first episode of ReMade, “The Most Dangerous Game”, is now available! (I blogged about this project here.)

$1.99 will get you the story in both print and audio formats for the eReader of your choice, or you can read it online or in the Serial Box iPhone app. It should take less than an hour to read, and if you haven’t been keeping up with the series, we do have a “Previously, on ReMade…” recap :)

If you’ve enjoyed my work, I hope you’ll check this out because I’m really proud and excited about it. And if you like what you see, you can get episode 1 for free and subscribe to the whole season at a discounted rate with a season pass–just like your favorite TV shows! That’s the best way to read the whole thing; I have two more episodes coming this season, Episode 8: “End of the Line” on Nov. 2 and Episode 11: “We’re Dead in This Ghost Town” on Nov. 23 (the special Thanksgiving episode, ha ha).

Thanks, and I appreciate comments, reviews, and all the signal boosting you can manage!


Foreign Currency

One of the most incredible things about being an author is having my book published outside of the United States. A few years ago we sold the rights to my first novel, Fair Coin, to Sharp Point Press, a Taiwanese publisher. I recently saw their stunning cover for the book, which I am thrilled to share with you:

fair coin tw

I am such a big fan of this! The book will be coming out in Taiwan in the fall, I think as early as next month. And Sharp Point has something really special in mind: They are selling books with replicas of the quantum coin Ephraim finds, which resemble a U.S. quarter from another universe in which Puerto Rico is the 51st state! Wow. I’ve seen a mock-up of the coin, and I am so excited and impressed. I hope I get one of those, and I’ll share pics of the finished book and coin when I can.

For comparison, below is the U.S. cover of Fair Coin, illustrated by Sam Weber, and because I’m not sure if I’ve shared it here before, the equally amazing Russian cover, by Darya Kuznetsova.


This has been a good book week for me. :)

Which cover do you like best?


Story Sale! (I hope!)

HYI usually don’t post about story sales until I have a signed contract in hand, but in the case of my story “In His Own Image”, which I sold to the anthology Hidden Youth: Speculative Stories of Marginalized Children (ed. Mikki Kendall and Chesya Burke), I held off a little longer.

See, although I have a contract, the anthology will not be published unless its ongoing Kickstarter is funded successfully. The publisher, Crossed Genres, ran into some financial difficulties and the previous preorder campaign didn’t generate enough interest to produce the book, but they’re committed to publishing it anyway — because telling these stories, by and about people with diverse backgrounds, who have traditionally been suppressed and sidelined by history and media, is vital. Fortunately, as of this writing, 715 backers agree. The Kickstarter has a little more than $2500 left to reach its goal in the next 36 hours.

Please help us get there! If you can’t spare the money right now, then please do what you can to spread the word as much as you can.

I’m really excited by the authors and stories in this collection, which includes many first publications by new writers — which is exactly what we hope to encourage. Check out the table of contents at the Kickstarter, but look at some of these titles: “How I Saved Athens from the Stone Monsters” (by Erik Jensen), “The Bread-Thing in the Basket” (by K.T. Katzmann), “The Ostrich Egg Girl” (by JM Templet). I want to read those! Don’t you? It also features a gorgeous cover by Hugo and Locus Award–winning artist Julie Dillon, and each story will have its own illustration as well!

What of my story? “In His Own Image” is a story set in early 20th century Korea, in the midst of a war with Japan fought with giant steampunk robots. Jun-min is a young, blind mechanic who is reluctantly recruited to the war effort. His only companions are his Seeing Eye—essentially a steampunk BB-8—and his screwy clockwork dad.

I really hope you have the chance to read it! Preorder Hidden Youth in eBook for $10, or contribute at any level from $1 to $80 for all sorts of fabulous prizes and packages. If you like short stories, stories in multicultural settings with interesting characters, or young adult fiction, I think you’ll like this anthology.

Thank you!



Kaleidoscope Sale!

KaleidoscopeCover-679x1024In celebration of Kaleidoscope: Diverse YA Science Fiction and Fantasy Stories being nominated for Australia’s prestigious Ditmar Award for Best Collected Work, the eBook of the anthology will be on sale for $1.99 from Thursday, April 2 through Monday, April 6! Whatever flavor you like your eBooks in — Kindle, Nook, Kobo, iBooks, etc. — it’s only $1.99!

This is a very fine collection of stories, and I’m so proud to be a part of it. I read the beginning of my story “Kiss and Kiss and Kiss and Tell” at the recording of LIVE AT THE WRITER’S HOUSE, which will air on Monday, April 6 at 8pm EST on WXPN. If you were there (thank you for coming!) find out what happens next by grabbing the $1.99 eBook. If you missed it, you can still listen on Monday and then get the book before the sale ends. You can also read some free stories from the collection online.

At only $1.99, with twenty fantastic stories from amazing authors*, there is zero probability that you will regret picking up Kaleidoscope!

Me reading from KALEIDOSCOPE at Live at the Writers House. Photo by Eric Smith.

Me reading from KALEIDOSCOPE at Live at the Writers House. Photo by Eric Smith.

* Yeah, in this instance I’m including me in that glowing praise, because I think this is one of my best stories and I felt pretty amazing when I wrote it.


book recommendation: Now That You’re Here

In a parallel universe, the classic bad boy falls for the class science geek.

One minute Danny was running from the cops, and the next, he jolted awake in an unfamiliar body–his own, but different. Somehow, he’s crossed into a parallel universe. Now his friends are his enemies, his parents are long dead, and studious Eevee is not the mysterious femme fatale he once kissed back home. Then again, this Eevee–a girl who’d rather land an internship at NASA than a date to the prom–may be his only hope of getting home.

Eevee tells herself she’s only helping him in the name of quantum physics, but there’s something undeniably fascinating about this boy from another dimension . . . a boy who makes her question who she is, and who she might be in another place and time.

I consider myself something of a connoisseur of stories about parallel universes. I’ve been a fan of multiple worlds since the Spock-with-a-beard episode of the original Star Trek, and I never tire of seeing the idea explored in television, films, and of course books. It seems like the last decade has enjoyed a kind of alternate-universe Renaissance; the idea of visiting other universes has gone from a niche concept like the old show Sliders in the 1990s to a mainstream popular culture phenomenon. That’s good news for aficionados like me who can’t get enough of these tales, but the flip side is that we’ve kind of seen everything by now. Or have we?

One of the joys of multiverse stories is that there are as many variations on the topic as there are (potentially) other worlds out there. The key to making these stories unique, entertaining, and moving is to focus on the characters who live them — and that’s where Amy K. Nichols’ debut YA novel, Now That You’re Here, shines. Main characters Eevee Solomon and Danny Ogden (who alternate chapters throughout the book), and a host of secondary characters including Eevee’s best friend Warren, are believable, sympathetic, and engaging. You need a compelling cast to ground a book like this in reality — take your pick of which — and whisk the reader along through the inevitable exposition. One of the trickiest parts of any book dealing with theoretical quantum physics is conveying it to readers, and Nichols manages that delicate balance well.

Rather than dwelling on the complex science that might make multiple worlds — and travel between them — possible, Nichols emphasizes the complexity of people: What makes us who we are, and the relationships that bind us together. What’s most important is how Danny’s jump from his universe to Eevee’s affects them both. Their stories intersect and parallel each other in surprising, fascinating ways; Danny loses his universe, a dystopian surveillance state, and in turn shakes up Eevee’s world, allowing her to realize just how controlled her own life has been. This book also celebrates geeks and how intelligence, curiosity, and compassion can empower teens to accomplish profound things — all with a bit of wit, humor, and romance.

From its literally explosive start, Now That You’re Here hooks the reader and pulls them into Eevee’s world right along with Danny. The mystery of how Danny exchanged places with his other self is explained (mostly) in a satisfying, and to me entirely fresh way, and the sensible and clever steps Eevee, Danny, and Warren take to unravel it and devise a solution to send him home is thrilling. But it’s the personal questions they ask of themselves and each other, and the answers they find together, that provides the real substance of the novel.

If you’re new to books about parallel universes, Now That You’re Here is the perfect place to launch your adventure across multiple worlds. And if you think you’ve seen it all, you’re wrong; though this book necessarily treads on some familiar ground, you haven’t met anyone like Eevee and Danny — or their other selves — yet. Fans of books like Parallel by Lauren Miller, Through to You by Emily Hainsworth, and Planesrunner by Ian McDonald shouldn’t miss this exciting take on the multiverse. I’m already looking forward to While You Were Gone, the second book in the Duplexity duology, in which we see what the alternate Eevee and Danny are up to in Danny’s parallel world. Brilliant, right?

Now That You’re Here by Amy K. Nichols is now available from Knopf Books for Young Readers. While You Were Gone (Duplexity #2) will follow in 2015.

This post originally appeared at The League of Extraordinary Writers.