Tag Archive for 'superman'

Page 2 of 2

thanks for playing!

The YAmazing Race with MGnificent Prizes is officially over!

Thank you to everyone who participated, whether you made it all the way to the end or not. I’ve enjoyed all of your comments about the race and Fair Coin here and on Twitter and I hope everyone had a lot of fun. I know the Apocalypsies enjoyed it. Now that you’ve heard about 50+ of our books, which are you looking forward to and why? (You don’t have to say Fair Coin—honest.)

There will definitely be more of these interblog events throughout the year to celebrate all our young adult and middle grade debuts in 2012, and I’ll be offering other opportunities to win some Fair Coin swag in the next couple of months, too. So stay tuned!

We now return this blog to its regularly scheduled programming, already in progress.

Share

how is a writing career like Smallville?

No doubt some of you shuddered in horror at the title of this post, but bear with me for a moment.

Last Friday, the series Smallville ended its record-breaking ten year run on the CW. As I prepared to watch the finale with friends this weekend, I reflected on that improbable incredible milestone and realized that it closely parallels a milestone of my own: I’ve been writing for publication for ten years, the entire time that show has been on the air. I wrote, revised, and submitted my first short story–which really wasn’t very short at all, nor publishable–only a few months before Smallville premiered in October of 2001.

And like young Clark Kent, I’ve come a long way since then. Here are some of the strange similarities I came up with:

  • Like Smallville, my stories usually start with unimaginative, single-word titles.
  • Like Clark’s love life, I had to deal with a lot of rejection before my first story was published.
  • I wrote some of my worst stories during the absolute worst year of the show, season 4. And that’s when I considered giving up on both the show and my writing career.
  • But then I graduated from Clarion West, and my writing improved greatly–just like the seasons after Clark graduated from Smallville High.
  • As Clark began to involve himself in a bourgeoning Justice League, I joined my own team of superheroes, the writers in Altered Fluid.
  • I set way too many of my stories in New York City, and far too much happens in Metropolis on the show.
  • In the last year, as Clark finally learned to be Superman, I sold my first novel! (There was even a subplot this season that has some resonance with Fair Coin, but I won’t get into that now.)
  • And… I’ve been planning my own wedding alongside Lois & Clark.

Eerie, isn’t it?

For all the show’s faults, and there were many of them, I’m glad I stuck with it for all these years, just as I stayed on the long road to publication. It’s even possible that the show somehow influenced my own work, since I was always critical of its meandering plot arcs, cliches, and poor dialogue–and hey, I am writing young adult fiction now, so all that high school drama counted for something. To take this post to an even more ludicrous level, the gradual way Clark added to his arsenal of superpowers over the years and learned to control each new ability is similar to the way writers must learn new skills and practice them, always pushing themselves to try new things in their fiction. The only thing keeping us from flying is our own fear of heights.

At the end of Smallville, another phase of Clark’s journey is just beginning, with its own challenges and rewards, and I’m eager to move on to the next stage of my career as I prepare for my first novel to come out. Up, up, and away!

Share

Superman Classic

If Disney made an animated Superman film, I think you’d pretty much end up with Hercules (1997). But Disney animator Rob Pratt has followed his own vision with this 60-second animated short, Superman Classic. Like Coke Classic, this labor of love brings back some of the things he’s enjoyed from the franchise, including stirring music from the Kirk Alyn serials, character designs inspired by the many looks of Clark Kent and Superman, and notably the voice work of John Newton, who originated the role of Superboy in the 1988 live-action The Adventures of Superboy. The storyline echoes Max Fleischer’s 1941 short film, The Mechanical Monsters, and Pratt’s hand-drawn animation is just as fluid and beautiful; nothing makes me believe a man can fly more than these cartoons. Anyway, check it out for yourself:

(via blastr)

Share

pew pew!

I present you with my interpretation of the Enterprise‘s faceoff against a giant asteroid in Star Trek‘s “The Paradise Syndrome.” Where’s Captain Kirk through all this excitement? On the planet “Amerind” with amnesia, cosplaying as a god/American Indian medicine chief named “Kirok.”

This episode reminded me of the famous Adventures of Superman episode “Panic in the Sky,” in which Superman loses his memory after colliding with an asteroid. It was remade on Lois & Clark: The New Adventures of Superman as “All Shook Up,” one of my favorite episodes because Ma Kent pushes Clark off a balcony to help him remember how to fly. What is it with asteroids and amnesia? (I’m sure some people would like to forget those asteroid disaster films Armageddon and Deep Impact.)

He'll remember this on Mother's Day

Share