Tag Archive for 'young adult'

hear coin

AudiblePerhaps it’s unsurprising that audiobooks take much less time to produce than print books, but still… Less than two months from signing the contract, you can now purchase and download my first YA novel, Fair Coin, in audiobook form in the U.S. and in the U.K. I expect it won’t take long for Quantum Coin to follow.

I’m so excited to have the book out in a different format, with other people adapting the text for a different audience. I’ve only heard the sample of the opening pages so far, but narrator MacLeod Andrews is amazing and his performance is absolutely perfect. It’s both odd and thrilling to hear someone else speaking words that have largely existed only in my head and my voice for so long, and it’s great to hear what MacLeod has done with the book.

To celebrate unlocking the audiobook achievement, here’s some related trivia:

  • Audible_FCThe U.K. audiobook is the first official release of Fair Coin in any foreign market!
  • MacLeod Andrews also provided the voice of one of the Will Graysons in the audiobook of a favorite YA book of mine, Will Grayson, Will Grayson by David Levithan and John Green.
  • One of MacLeod’s recent YA audiobook releases was the excellent Steelheart by Brandon Sanderson, who I share an agent with. Some of MacLeod’s other notable (to me) projects for Brilliance Audio and Audible include Jumper by Steven Gould, Monsters of Men by Patrick Ness, and Lies Beneath by Anne Greenwood Brown (one of my fellow Apocalypsies).
  • My mom never read to me when I was a kid (don’t feel too sorry for me, I had a pretty good handle on it on my own), but I really enjoy hearing someone tell me a story. I think it reminds me of the first grade and Reading Rainbow. So maybe that’s why I like going to readings and listening to audiobooks and podcasts!
  • Now when someone asks me how long Fair Coin is, I can tell them it’s about 9 hours and 40 minutes. The unabridged audiobook is roughly as long as the Lord of the Rings film trilogy!

So if you’ve been waiting for the audiobook, wait no longer! I hope lots of people who haven’t yet read Fair Coin give it a try.

Get FAIR COIN at Audible.com (United States) — FREE with 30-day free trial membership
Get FAIR COIN at Audible.co.uk (United Kingdom)

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hey! listen!

Audible

Good news, everyone! We’ve just sold the audio book rights to Fair Coin and Quantum Coin to Audible! Special thanks to my fab agents at JABberwocky who made this possible, Eddie Schneider and Lisa Rodgers.

I’m thrilled because I basically want anyone who might be interested in my books to be able to enjoy them in whatever format they like, and I know lots of people prefer audio books over paper. I also love being read to, and I’m excited to see another interpretation of the stories I wrote. But this deal is especially nice because the duology will finally be available in the UK!

I don’t have any details yet on who will be narrating the books or when they’ll be available, because this pretty much just happened. I doubt I’ll have any input on who the reader will be, but hey, I’d get a kick out of it if Tom Welling or Dean Cain read them.

Who do you think would be the best reader for the audio book versions of Fair Coin and Quantum Coin? And what’s your favorite audio book?

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busiest readercon ever!

Readercon is one of my favorite SFF conventions, so I’m excited to be participating in programming this year. My schedule is busy for my first time as a guest, and I’m especially looking forward to the many interesting YA panels on the program.

If you’re attending Readercon in Burlington, MA this month, I’ll be there from Thursday, July 11 – Sunday, July 14. My schedule is below: You can find me on panels, get books signed during my autographing session (or indeed, if you see me anywhere else and I’m not in a hurry or otherwise occupied), meet me for coffee (or kaffee?), or come to one of my readings.

The program guide says I’m reading from my current YA novel in progress (a standalone book unrelated to Fair Coin and Quantum Coin), but I may read from a new YA short story instead (or do one at my solo reading and the other at my group reading with Altered Fluid). We’ll see. I also assume my books will be on sale somewhere in the dealer room, but if not, I may have a very small supply with me.

I hope to see you there!

Friday, July 12

8:00 PM    RI    Life After Clarion. Ron Drummond, Scott Edelman, E.C. Myers, Resa Nelson (leader), Ken Schneyer.
The Clarion SF Workshop is one of the best in the world for budding science fiction, fantasy, and horror writers. Many of today’s award-winning authors are Clarion graduates. For six weeks, Clarion students have the luxury of learning from top-notch authors and editors while living the life of a full-time writer. But once Clarion ends, what do you do next? How do you take what you learn at Clarion and apply it to your writing life and your real life? And how do you adjust from having the support of other writers to possibly having very little or none at all? Professional writers who graduated from Clarion in the ’80s, ’90s, and ’00s share their life-after-Clarion experiences. Proposed by Resa Nelson.

Saturday, July 13

9:00 AM    CL    Kaffeeklatsch. E.C. Myers, Rick Wilber. (Sign up in advance for kaffeeklatsches at the Information Desk, beginning at 10 a.m. on Friday.)

10:00 AM    F    To YA or Not to YA. Jordan Hamessley, E.C. Myers, Phoebe North, Charles Oberndorf, Veronica Schanoes (leader), Shveta Thakrar.
There are plenty of adult books with teen heroes, like Jeffrey Eugenides’s Middlesex and Lev Grossman’s The Magicians. Some books that were not aimed at teens when they came out are mostly read by them today, like Orson Scott Card’s Ender’s Game. Some books are marketed as YA in one country and adult in another. So what makes a book “a YA book”? Do we just know it when we see it, or is there a way to pin this down beyond listening to marketing campaigns?

2:00 PM    NH    Altered Fluid Group Reading. Paul Berger, Rajan Khanna, Sam J. Miller, E.C. Myers, Devin Poore, Mercurio D. Rivera.
Members of the Manhattan-based Altered Fluid writers group will read excerpts from their forthcoming works.
3:00 PM    VT    Reading: E.C. Myers. E.C. Myers.
E.C. Myers reads an excerpt from a YA novel in progress.
10:30 PM    F/G    Meet the Pro(se) Party

Sunday, July 14

11:00 AM    E    Autographs. Andrea Hairston, E.C. Myers.
12:00 PM    G    Writing for Younger Readers. Lisa Janice (LJ) Cohen, Jordan Hamessley, Alaya Dawn Johnson, E.C. Myers (leader), Phoebe North, Shveta Thakrar.
How do middle grade (MG) and young adult (YA) authors and editors write for children and teen readers? How do they make science fiction more accessible for kids, build complex fantasy worlds, and develop authentic characters with diverse backgrounds? This panel is ideal for anyone writing MG or YA or interested in finding books with plots as rich and complex as any novel targeted to adult readers. Proposed by E.C. Myers.

You can view and download the full conference schedule here.

I would also like to thank Rose Fox, Readercon 24 Program Chair, and their committee for putting this program together. It is no small task coordinating everyone’s requests and a schedule with so many moving targets, while crafting a program that will appeal to the interests of such a diverse group of attendees. And I appreciate that YA, in particular, has received some more attention this year.

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links to the past

Apologies for the lack of my Alternate Wednesday posts of late; oddly enough, it’s a matter of not having enough time for them. I thought the biweekly schedule would be manageable, but with a novel to revise and multiple deadlines for various projects (including several other blogs I contribute to–see below), it has been the easiest thing to put aside. But I enjoy writing them, and I hope some of you enjoy reading them, so they will continue–but perhaps on a sporadic basis for the moment.

"Yesterday's Enterprise"That said, I’m double-dipping this week. It’s no surprise that many of my favorite episodes of Star Trek (in all its incarnations) involve time travel and/or alternate realities. So last week I was happy to cover one of the very best of these in the ongoing Star Trek: The Next Generation Re-Watch at The Viewscreen: “Yesterday’s Enterprise“. Here’s an excerpt:

But I tell you, this episode is exciting, not least because it fills in some of the time between Kirk’s era and the TNG years, with the introduction of the Enterprise-C. (It hits some of the same buttons for me that “Babylon Squared” on Babylon 5 does, my favorite episode of the first season in which the Babylon 4 station reappears due to a temporal anomaly…) And I love this vessel, a beautiful melding of the best features of the Constitution-class and Galaxy-class designs. “Yesterday’s Enterprise” also has high stakes, gruesome deaths, and it looks and sounds more cinematic than anything on the show previously. I’m also a sucker for stories in which one ship or one person makes a huge impact for others–even in failure; we always root for the Enterprise to survive, but the idea that one crew’s sacrifice could still be a victory of sorts is gratifying.

Pop over there to see my episode recap and read reviews by me, Torie Atkinson, and our fine commenters.

I also had two other guest blog posts this week, if you haven’t had enough of me:

And finally, here’s a link to download a free PDF of Sybil’s Garage No. 7, which among many fantastic pieces includes one of my favorite short stories that I’ve written, “My Father’s Eyes”. It’s even kind of YA-ish, though with a slightly older main character, a photographer named Ambrose. And here’s the editor talking about the issue, Anne Frank, Justin Bieber, and the band Neutral Milk Hotel.

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think younger

hugo-logo*climbs onto soapbox* *teeters*

I don’t usually get on soapboxes. I have poor balance and I don’t like it when everyone looks at me like that… Yeah, like that. But I just noticed that the deadline for voting for the Hugo Awards is approaching–March 10th!

If you attended Worldcon last year or have a membership for this or next year’s Worldcon, you are eligible to vote for the Hugo Awards. Please do! The good news is that even if you can’t make it to the convention, anyone can buy a non-attending membership for $60 which will let them vote for the awards, but I don’t actually know who does that.

Anyway, I love books for children. Probably 90% of my leisure reading consists of middle grade and young adult books. I write young adult books. So I was very pleased when I heard last year that there was a proposal to add a new award category for Best Children’s/Young Adult Book.

And I was shocked when it was voted down.

Continue reading ‘think younger’

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