Tag Archive: YA

there are many copies, but these are mine

As you can tell from the ongoing giveaway at Goodreads, I recently received some Advance Reading Copies (ARCs) of Fair Coin. These are bound paperbacks that resemble the final book but contain uncorrected text. Typos, even. (I hates them, Preciousss.) What are ARCs for? Essentially, they’re for promoting your new book. My amazing publicist at Pyr has been sending them to book reviewers and bloggers, and the copies I received are earmarked for promotions and for booksellers, librarians, and reviewers I hope will be interested in it.

I wasn’t as emotional as I expected when I opened the package–I pretty much only cry at Pixar movies these days–but it was definitely a Big Deal. I was excited to get an ARC because it’s like a prototype of the book to come, another step that makes it feel like more of a reality. In fact, no sooner did I prepare to post a goofy picture of me posing with an ARC, but the actual, hardcover author copies arrived! A month early!

I know, that’s not my book. I’m glad you noticed.

But see, my idea of what it’s like to unbox the shiny new copies of your first book has basically been informed by Back to the Future. What? I love that movie. My moment was more like this:

Let’s just pretend that Bach is more interested in my book than playing with those Styrofoam peanuts.

When I opened the box and took out the copy on top, I only glanced at it before handing it to my wife. I took another copy from the box and looked it over thoroughly, even lifting the jacket to peek at the bare hardcover beneath it. (She was fine with that, and a little curious herself.)

I didn’t even think about letting my wife see the book first; she was the first person to read and critique that messy early draft of Fair Coin. This was her moment too. I think I said something like, “We did it.” That’s when I realized that opening that box wasn’t just about the achievement of getting a book published, it was about who I can share it with: the family and friends and everyone who helped make it happen. That’s a lot of people. I should have felt proud, but instead I was simply… Grateful.

And I also kept thinking about that scene in the greatest time travel movie ever made, in which a happy ending features a writer surrounded by his family (and Biff), holding his first science fiction novel.

Thanks, McFly.

(I look tired, don’t I? I guess “If you put your mind to it, and skip a lot of sleep, you can accomplish almost anything, probably” is a weaker theme for a movie.)

win an early copy of Fair Coin!

Here’s your first chance to win a copy of my first YA novel, Fair Coin, before it releases next month. The giveaway ends next week, and if the winners want it for a Valentine’s Day gift, I’ll even throw in some sort of express shipping. :) Books make for great romantic gifts!

Just click below for a chance to win one of two ARCs (Uncorrected Advance Reading Copies). And please, tell your friends!

Goodreads Book Giveaway

Fair Coin by E.C. Myers

Fair Coin

by E.C. Myers

Giveaway ends February 12, 2012.

See the giveaway details
at Goodreads.

Enter to win

 

Advance praise for Fair Coin:

“[A] fantastic, nonstop thrill ride. I barely remembered to breathe!”

–Sarah Beth Durst, author of Drink, Slay, Love
“Funny, flirtatious, and unexpectedly poignant, Fair Coin takes the phrase ‘be careful what you wish for’ and runs with it. A standout…”

–Lauren McLaughlin, author of Scored
“You’ll flip over Fair Coin!”

–Nathan Mackenzie, Ephraim’s best friend

read an excerpt from Fair Coin

Pyr has just unveiled their new Pyr Young Adult Facebook Page!

If you click over there and “Like” it, you’ll be able to download the first three chapters of my upcoming YA novel, Fair Coin, well before its scheduled release late next monthIf you’re already signed up for Facebook, it’ll only take a few seconds of your time and a modest amount of hand-eye coordination and dexterity.

I hope you enjoy this exclusive preview of Fair Coin, and please take a moment to check out the excellent Pyr YA books that have preceded it.

looking for a few good books

I’m serving on the 2011 jury for SFWA’s Andre Norton Award for Young Adult Science Fiction and Fantasy, which is able to add up to three books to the award ballot, to ensure a broad selection of the best in the genre. We are actively reading eligible works published in 2011, and welcome authors and publishers to recommend or submit (in print or electronic formats) noteworthy YA books. Nominations from SFWA membership and the Norton Jury will be announced in February and the award will be presented at the Nebula Awards on May 19, 2012 at the Hyatt Regency Crystal City in Arlington, Virginia.

The Jury is keenly interested in reviewing works that may not have received a lot of attention, books from small presses, graphic novels, and books that were not published as YA (such as middle grade) but could have been.

Feel free to recommend books to me in this post’s comments, or e-mail me directly at emyers+norton -at- gmail.com to make recommendations privately and/or discuss submissions for consideration. You can also contact the entire jury at nortonjury@sfwa.org. Thank you!

The Andre Norton Award for an outstanding young adult science fiction or fantasy book was established in 2006 by Science Fiction & Fantasy Writers of America. The award is named in honor of the late Andre Norton, a SFWA Grand Master and author of more than 100 novels, many of them for young adult readers. Norton’s work has influenced generations of young people, creating new fans of the fantasy and science fiction genres and setting the standard for excellence in fantasy writing. Any book published as a young adult science fiction/fantasy novel is eligible, including graphic novels with no limit on word length.

children’s literary salon

This afternoon I joined some friends at the New York Public Library Children’s Literary Salon, a monthly gathering of adults who love children’s fiction of all age groups and genres. I used to frequent this series when it was the Children’s Lit Cafe at the now-defunct Donnell branch of the NYPL, but despite my best intentions, this is the first event I’ve attended since the Children’s Room moved to the Main Branch. (You know, the one with the lions.)

The room was mostly full, which is encouraging when the media keeps trying to convince us that no one reads anymore. It’s also wonderful that so many grownups are interested in children’s literature. (There actually were some kids there too, though this seems to be frowned upon.) Betsy Bird moderated a panel on the topic of “Blood, Bones, and Gore: Horror and the Modern Children’s Book,” which featured authors Kate Milford (The Boneshaker), Adam Gidwitz (A Tale Dark & Grimm), and Michael Teitelbaum (The Scary States of America). The Boneshaker and Dark & Grimm were already on my to-read list, now joined by Teitelbaum’s short story collection of 50 scary “true” stories from across America. The authors preferred to classify their books as scary/creepy rather than horror, which they defined as the uncanny–a twisting of the familiar into the unfamiliar–and an exploration of the things that frighten us in real life.

I was glad that the “ARC cart” is still a feature of the Salon: a library cart full of advance reading copies up for grabs. Have you ever seen a group of avid readers descend on a pile of free books? Watch out! Actually, everyone is polite and orderly–even when someone takes the last copy of a book you really want just before you can get to it. (Not that this has ever happened to me, mind.) I made out pretty well though, which is good since I have three new books to buy.


I love getting early release copies of books, partly because I’m impatient to read an upcoming book I’m excited about, and partly because it makes me feel special to have something before most other people and I’m needy that way. I’m not alone in this, right? Unfortunately, I’m also usually way behind on my reading, so I may not read an ARC until long after the actual book has been published (eg. Fire by Kristin Cashore). I’ve been hearing about Cindy Pon’s Fury of the Phoenix for a while though, so that moves pretty high on my list of next reads, even though it’s on the bottom in this picture for structural integrity. What’s next on your reading pile?

The Salon is generally held on the first Saturday of the month at 2pm at the NYPL Children’s Center at 42nd Street and 5th Avenue. Next month they’re going to discuss children’s poetry on February 5.