Short Stories

the value of teamwork

One of the most common writing myths portrays the lonely author, struggling in solitude to create art. There’s some truth to this–at the end of the day, it does all come down to a writer sitting down and committing words to the page, putting pen to paper or tapping diligently at keys. And I’m sure there are many writers today who do write in a kind of void, all alone with their thoughts and/or nature.

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would you like to take a survey?

Shimmer magazine has posted a quick survey that asks, Which issue 13 story was your favorite?

I think all the short stories in the latest issue are great. I’m also shameless enough to include my own story, “All the Lonely People,” in that completely impartial critique. The story that receives the most votes will be published online, and everyone who participates will be entered in a random drawing to receive any issue of Shimmer free. So everyone wins! Except nine of the authors. But you know, that’s how it goes.

So please take 42.567 seconds to check out the Reader’s Choice survey, click on your favorite story, and leave some comments about Issue #13!

If you still haven’t read Issue 13, you can order it here. If you download the electronic edition, you even have enough time to read it and cast your vote before the survey closes at midnight MST on Thursday, June 30, 2011.

all the lonely reviews

Though it might be better practice to ignore reviews of my stories, at this point in my career I just can’t resist peeking at them. At the very least, they’re evidence that people other than my friends are reading my work. Fortunately, so far they have been rather favorable, and I’m just pleased that reviewers are spelling my name right. Here, then, are a few reviews of Shimmer magazine issue #13, which includes my short story “All the Lonely People”:

Locus Online
Lois Tilton calls my story a “depressing look at urban existence,” which is precisely what I was going for.

SFRevu
Sam Tomaino calls it a “sad, bittersweet tale.”

The Portal
Jessica Barnes says, “The concept and writing are stellar, as with the rest of the collection…”

You can order print ($6) and electronic ($4) editions of the issue online, read an interview with me, or view a video clip of me reading part of “All the Lonely People.”

shimmery goodness

In what’s becoming an annual tradition, a new short story of mine was just published in a small press fantasy magazine, this time Shimmer magazine. I certainly feel lucky that my story “All the Lonely People” is in issue # 13, now available for order (in electronic and print editions). I’ve wanted to be published in Shimmer since I saw the second issue, which gives you an idea of how long I’ve been sending them fiction and the value of persistence.

Some of you may recall that I read “All the Lonely People” at the Altered Fluid reading at NYRSF last June, where people didn’t hate it. Here’s a brief excerpt:

I found the woman in the last train car; her kind is usually drawn to the edges of things, wherever they can be alone, wherever they can go unnoticed. She was reading a poster on the back wall, both hands gripping the seatbacks on either side of the aisle as if they were holding her up. I could see through her to the poster, an ad for classes at some community college.

She was a fader.

That’s what I call them, those caught in that limbo that claims more and more people every day. I don’t know what that makes those of us who can see them. I assume there are others like me, but it’s not like I got a membership card and a list of instructions the day I discovered my ability. No one told me what it’s for.

You should also pick up the magazine to check out great stories by other authors: K.M. Ferebee, Erik T. Johnson, L.L. Hannett, Richard Larson, J.J. Irwin, Georgina Bruce, Stephen Case, Ferrett Steinmetz, and Poor Mojo’s Giant Squid.

And if you want to read something free while you wait for the issue to arrive in your mailbox or inbox, you can always read an interview with me at Shimmer or my shortish essay on my history with Star Trek in today’s series wrap-up at TheViewscreen.com.

for your award consideration

So, the nomination period for the 2011 Hugo Awards closes this Saturday, March 26th at 23:59 PDT, which seems fairly specific. I know it’s the longest of long shots, but hey, a story of mine was published in 2010 and apparently I’m not the only one who thinks it’s pretty good.

I’d be remiss if I didn’t throw my story into the ring, so here goes. If you have a supporting or attending membership to the 2011 Worldcon in Reno, Nevada, and you’d like to consider nominating my story, “My Father’s Eyes” (Sybil’s Garage No. 7, July 2010) for the Hugo Award for Best Short Story, just e-mail me or contact me through Twitter, Facebook, LiveJournal or whatever (I’m pretty easy to find online), and I’ll send you a free electronic copy. Please indicate whether you’d like it as a PDF, EPUB, or RTF document. You don’t even have to like it, but of course, I hope you do!